News

Showing items tagged with "Cyber crime reduce risk" - 2 found.

Key ways for PAs and EAs to improve defence to cyber crime

Posted Friday June 7th, 2019, 8:10 pm by

Top tips to improve human resistance to cyber crime,  The weakest link in any organisation’s defence to cyber crime is us the users.  Here are top tips to for PAs and EAs spot possible vulnerabilities and actions to take to improve your defence to a potential cyber attack. Published in Executive Secretary Magazine June 2019

Tags: , ,

Read this post... | Comment on this post

Cyber crime – five top tips to improve the human defence line

Posted Monday May 13th, 2019, 7:36 pm by

Why is cyber crime so prevalent when most organisations have cast iron technological defences?

Would it suppose you to know that we are the weakest link in the organisation’s defence against cyber crime.  Why? Because we are often time poor and speed is of the essence.

Cyber crime the weakest link

We grab a coffee whilst using a mobile device and forget to look around  to see who is watching us and listening to us as we key in our passwords.  Yes, the professional hacker can detect your key strokes by special listening devices.  Maybe we leave our mobile devices open whilst talking to friends.  Email is the number one vector for a cyber attack.  75% of all cyber attacks emanate from email.  In our haste to clear our bulging inboxes, by accident we open an email which carries malware.

Five top tips to reduce the risk of a cyber attack

Here are ten top tips to help you and your organisation reduce the risk of human error in the fight against cyber crime.  It is an extract from Mesmo Consultancy’s new masterclass ‘Human Defence to Cyber Crime’.

In public places

1. Use a pseudo name when ordering food in very public places like coffee bars and fast food shops.

2. Keep all mobile devises either closed or face down when not in use.

Email

3. Have respect for email. Take time when dealing with the inbox no matter how busy you are.

4. Phone senders if you are the slightest bit suspicious about an email: there is a spelling mistake, caps are used etc. Often the sender will not know their account has been hacked until you call.

Password management

5. Change your passwords frequently and at least every three to six months, making sure you either create a strong one or use a password management app.

Need more help?

Would you and your colleagues benefit by going from being the weakest link in the fight against cyber crime to being the most robust and resilient?

Call or email us now for more information about our new masterclass – ‘Human Defence to Cyber Crime’.

Tags: , , , , ,

Read this post... | Comment on this post