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Showing items tagged with "Clean Inbox Week" - 5 found.

10th International Clean Inbox Week – Day 4

Posted Wednesday January 25th, 2017, 10:44 pm by

Day 4 – Brilliant Email Etiquette to Keep the Inbox Clean

I can feel the twinkle of his eyes in his handshake.  Helen Keller

Yesterday was Mental Health day in Canada initiated by Bell LetsTalk.  Email Overload is a major source of stress and contributor to mental health problems.  One of the quickest ways to stop email overload is to reduce the rounds of email ping-pong.  Using brilliant email etiquette to convey the right message, right first time will help. Moreover, you have less than five seconds before the recipient has formed an opinion of you for better or worse.  Poor email etiquette can damage your reputation in a nanosecond.Cleaninbox2

Based on using brilliant email etiquette, here are today’s four steps to reduce even further the level of email overload and hence keep the inbox clean and empty.

Step 1 – Benchmark your email etiquette

Use our special free email Business Etiquette Check List to benchmark your email etiquette.  Where and how can you improve?

Step 2 – Review your inbox for existing chains

Are there any email chains which could have been prevented if you had either communicated more clearly or planned ahead?  What lessons can you learn from these?

Step 3 – Review your email before hitting send

Ask yourself, what image am I conveying of myself? How clear and concise is my email based in the checklist at Step 1. Brilliant Emailsecretary1

Did you include an adequate greeting and closure to entice the recipient to respond properly?  For more tips on how email etiquette can help you achieve an empty inbox and reduce email overload see Brilliant Email chapter 12 and ‘Taking Control of Your Inbox‘ chapter 11.

Step 4 – Help others improve their email etiquette

Be bold. If you receive an email you cannot understand on the first reading, ask the sender what they are trying to say.  Send them a link to our Email Etiquette Checklist.

Dare to share

Share your progress; EmailFacebookTwitter  (using #cleaninbox)  There is a prize for the person who has used email etiquette most effectively (a copy of ‘Brilliant Email‘).

For  more resource

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PS. Don’t forget to keep cleaning up that folder of old emails which you created on Day 1 (and indeed any other bulging folders).

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10th International Clean Inbox Week – Day 3

Posted Tuesday January 24th, 2017, 9:26 pm by

Day 3 – How to Reduce Email Overload

Develop an uncanny ability to be selectively ignorant.  Timothy Ferriss.

Now you need to reduce the number of emails you receive each day to reduce the email overload and continue to enjoy an empty inbox.  Deleting simply is not an option. You have be proactive and keep all unwanted emails out of your inbox and reduce the number of times you check for new email.

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Step 1 – Prioritise each new email you receive today 

How many of the emails you receive do you really need?  Triage your emails as you deal with them.  Ask yourself  ‘Do I really need this email?’ ‘How useful is this to me?’  For more guidance on prioritising see Brilliant Email chapter 3 and ‘Taking Control of Your Inbox  if you are a PA or EA.

Step 2 – Stop all non-essential emails from reaching your inbox

For all those low priority emails, either get yourself off the sender’s list or automatically move them out of your inbox so they don’t distract you from the really important ones.   Your inbox should be your ‘work in hand’ just like an old fashioned in-tray.  Ways to reduce the incoming email traffic and hence email overload are:

  • Unsubscribe.
  • Ask the sender to remove you from their list.
  • Use rules to send them automatically to a folder/Trash.

Click here to see how to write rules that allow you see only the important emails (and not waste time on email distractions dealing with the lower priority ones).

Step 3 – Reduce the number of times you deal with email

How often do you currently check for new emails?  When was the last time you received an email which would mean a catastrophe if you did not respond for about an hour?  Give yourself a break from the inbox to allow yourself to focus on the task in-hand for at least 30 minutes and preferably one hour.  Try not deal with your email too late into the night as that can seriously effect your quality of sleep and your work-life balance.

Dare to share

Share your progress; EmailFacebookTwitter  (using #cleaninbox)  There are two prizes today. One for the person who has made the best progress reducing the number of times they check their email and one for the person who has reduced the volume of email they receive most substantially (a copy of ‘Brilliant Email‘ and ‘Taking Control of Your Inbox’ written especially for PAs, EAs and VAs).

For  more resource

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Do you feel others colleagues would benefit from help cleaning out their inboxes?  Why not either join them up to this week’s programme or ask MesmoConsultancy to run one of our Brilliant Email Management master classes?

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10th International Clean Inbox Week – Day 2

Posted Monday January 23rd, 2017, 8:59 pm by

Day 2 – Keeping the Inbox Clean

There is a huge stress (associated) with disorganisation and there is also a cost to being disorganised. Carolee Cannata

The real work of reducing email overload starts today. Having cleared out all the old emails, the goal is keep the inbox clean.  Develop the habit of  handling each email once and only once.Cleaninbox2

Step 1 – Handle each (new) email once and do something with it

Use the Ds principle as you open each email:

Deal; Delegate; Delete or Defer.

Never, never open an email and then close it without taking action. This just wastes time as you then go back and forth re-reading emails.

Step 2 – Develop a robust strategy for deferred emails

Develop a process for you for making sure you keep tabs on those emails which still need action. For example, create a task, add a flag, move them to a ‘Pending’ folder. What ever happens don’t just leave them lying around in your inbox.

For more resource

Invest in a copy of either ‘Brilliant Email’ or for ‘Taking Control of Your Inbox’ (written especially for PAs, EAs and VAs).

Tomorrow we look at how to reduce the volume of email traffic through your inbox.

Dare to share

Share your progress; Email; Facebook: Twitter (using #cleaninbox) There is prize for the person with the best way of keeping track of emails on which you defer action (copy of ‘Brilliant Email’ or ‘Taking Control of Your Inbox’).

Twitter_logo_blueFollow me on Twitter using #cleaninbox.

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Linkedin, Google+ etc.

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How effective is email for communications? Guest Blog from David Grossman

Posted Thursday January 23rd, 2014, 9:02 pm by

As part of the 7th International Clean Out Your Inbox Week, I was privileged to work with David Grossman CEO and founder of the Grossman Group leaders in strategic leadership and internal communication.  This is the first of three discussions we had by a variety of media (phone, email etc).

Monica: Just how effective do you feel email is as a communications tool?

David: Email can be a highly effective communications tool, if used properly.  That’s a big “if.”  It’s a vehicle we love to hate, and many of us struggle with e-tiquette.  Here are the most common abuses and bad habits that get in the way:

  • Selecting email as the wrong method of communication
  • Poorly written emails
  • Sending irrelevant information
  • Engaging in too much back-and-forth when a phone call would solve the issue
  • Hiding behind email for tough conversations
  • No call-to-action
  • Using “reply all” liberally
  • CC’ing unnecessarily
  • Saying something in email you wouldn’t want to read in the newspaper

No wonder email gets a bad rap.  Very few of us can say that we haven’t committed at least one of the sins above.  We’re part of the problem, and also can be part of the solution.

The second interview reviews how we can make our email communications more effective and at the same time reduce the volume of email overload.

David Grossman, ABC, APR, Fellow PRSA helps leaders drive productivity and get the results they want through authentic and courageous leadership communication, a sought-after speaker and advisor to Fortune 500 leaders. A two-time author, David is CEO of The Grossman Group, an award-winning Chicago-based strategic leadership development and internal communication consultancy; clients include: DuPont Pioneer, Lockheed Martin, McDonald’s, Motel 6 and Tyco, to name a few.

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Start the Year with a Clean Inbox

Posted Thursday January 2nd, 2014, 4:14 pm by

Clean Inbox Week 2014

Would you like to start the year with a clean inbox and learn how to keep it clean and reduce email overload?   Join Mesmo Consultancy for the 7th International Clean Out Your Inbox week January 20 to 24.  This year the email babes (Marsha Egan and myself) are thrilled to be joined by Steuart Snooks, Australia’s leading email management expert.We have created a dedicated Facebook page from which you will be able to access lots of new materials (from tips and hints to interviews with other leading email management experts).  This is in addition to the daily blogs and Twitter tips to help you each day.

 

 

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Click here to join our Facebook page and Like us please.

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More details to follow next week.  Meanwhile, happy new year and thank you for your support during 2013.  It was much appreciated.  We look forward to seeing you in 2014.

 

 

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