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Showing items tagged with "Michael Einstein" - 4 found.

January 2017 – Articles of Note

Posted Wednesday January 18th, 2017, 9:50 pm by

  1. Creating a very strong password – many people reported having their social media accounts hacked.  First, check what apps have access to your account and delete any you do not recognise.  Second and most crucial step is to change your password and make sure it’s really strong.Typewritter
  2. Email signature – what to include – this is a recurrent theme.  Most email signatures are far too long and contain too many images. Email correspondence is not the place to market either your business or yourself.  Keep the signature simple yet informative. This Quora post outlines what vital information to include and what to omit.
  3. Hashtag your email for easy searching – you can add a hidden hashtag to emails you search which can make it easier for you to find them.  This gem is thanks to Michael Einstein my fellow IORG board member.
  4. Oxford college apologises for sharing names of rejected applicants – this is perhaps the worst email fiasco for some time.  Hertford College sent an email to each reject with the list of all those who had been rejected!  A real case of send in haste and repent at leisure.
  5. Uncivil lawyers get personal …in all-staff email – yes even solicitors can forget the difference between Reply and Reply-All when airing personal grievances. Maybe not suprising their firm (King & Wood Mailesons)  is in administration but suspect the two key players (Tim Taylor and George Pinkham) might have difficulty finding new jobs after this email fiasco!

How can you safeguarding your organisation from the risks of such email fiascos? One easy way is to invite Mesmo Consultancy to run an email management and business email etiquette masterclass.

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Email etiquette – listen

Posted Sunday June 7th, 2015, 3:25 pm by

Michael Einstein of Email Overload Solutions recently wrote about listening properly before replying.   For us at Mesmo Consultancy this so resonated with all we say about think before hitting send we wanted to share it with you (and for which he gave us permission).

Listening is a critical part of communication. It is an activity many people take for granted yet perform quite poorly.  Active listening can help greatly improve your communication with others.

It is very easy to “hear” but can be very difficult to actually “listen”. Have you ever found yourself planning a response to someone before they even finished speaking?

Has listening just become a game of waiting for the time for when someone stops speaking so that you can start talking yourself? This is where active listening can be improve your communication abilities. Stephen R. Covey, author of “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change”, wisely said:

Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply”.

How many time have you hit send before you have really read and thought through what the sender is saying?   Here are Mesmo Consultancy’s top five tips to improve your email listening and communication skills.

Email listening

Email listening

  1. Practice slow and quiet email etiquette. Wait at least five minutes before replying to an email and if needs be re-read the email.
  2. Check that you have read to the end of the email.
  3. Review your response before hitting send and ensure you have answered all the questions/points raised.
  4. Avoid complex words and long sentences which others may not understand.
  5. Use the 3S’s of email communications:  Structured: Simple words: Succinct.

Click here to check your personal email etiquette.  For more help on listening well to improve business email communications contact us about our Brilliant Email workshops and masterclasses.

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November Articles of Note

Posted Tuesday November 4th, 2014, 10:52 pm by

Here are the articles and blogs which caught our attention in October.

  1.  Debrett’s misguided use of Bcc etiquette with a reply from Dr Seeley on the correct time and place to use bcc rather than To and cc.
  2. Three approaches to reducing email overload – guest post by Michael Einstein on why changing organisational email culture is so crucial.Typewritter
  3. Defend yourself: the police can’t cope with cybercrime.  The police can no longer cope with the scale of on-line fraud.  The City of London’s chief Police Commissioner urges users to act more responsibly.
  4. Cybercrime battling a growth industry. Cybercrime is estimated to cost industry over $400bn. A review of sources and strategies to tackle cyber crime.
  5. New Ponemon report shows cyber crime on the rise. Cybercrime is estimated to be rising by 10% per year.
  6. That itch to check your inbox is only human.   Its the marshmallow syndrome all over again, or is it?
  7. How tech is changing the way we think and what we think about. An off the wall look into the future from Clive Thomson author of ‘Smarter Than you Think’.

What have we missed. What did you read which caught you eye?

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The Three Approaches to reducing Email Overload – Guest post by Dr Michael Einstein

Posted Tuesday September 16th, 2014, 10:32 am by

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Dr Michael Einstein

Many, business people receive 100 (or more) messages a day and spend 2 to 3 hours a day on email related activities, consuming 20 to 30% of their business day. Not surprisingly, many complain of suffering from email overload

Email, with its myriad of features, functions, and capabilities, combined with its high volumes and constant interruptions, has become one of the most frequently used yet continually challenging business applications for today’s workers to navigate.

So, what is the solution to managing email overload issues?  My research has found that the key strategies to deal with email overload fall into three broad approaches: organizationaltechnical, and behavioral.

1) Organizational approaches

Organizational approaches to reducing email overload incorporate the use of acceptable use policies as a way to set organization-wide rules for the appropriate, and inappropriate, use of email. These approaches are also referred to as email etiquette or netiquette, and focus on teaching people to use email more appropriately.

These can be employed differently depending upon the organization, ranging from being enforced as formalized policies, communicated as strongly suggested guidelines, or expressed as cultural norms of expected behavior. They establish a common set of values, expectations, and behaviors around the use of email, and work at the macro level, reducing the email overload burden for everyone.

2) Technical approaches

Technical approaches to reducing email overload leverage specific features and functionality in the email system itself as ways to reduce email overload. This approach has traditionally been the primary focus area for most email training programs with the goal on improving an individual’s fluency in the email system and thereby allowing people to use email more efficiently.

Research has found that there is often little formalized training on the use of email, as most people are (incorrectly) presumed to already be email proficient. Even those who deem themselves email savvy are often only familiar with a small fraction of their email system’s features and capabilities. A technical approach can yield significant improvements in individual email skills, resulting in large reductions in email overload.

For Outlook users, click here to check how savvy you are with your email software.

3) Behavioral approaches

Behavioral approaches to reducing email overload focus on improving the knowledge, actions, and behavior of individuals. This approach incorporates the areas of media competencies and email processing (triage) techniques and focus on teaching people to use email more effectively.

Media competencies include topics such as when email is an appropriate (or inappropriate) form of communication, how to build high-quality email subject lines, and writing structured message bodies. email processing (triage) encompasses focuses on strategies on how to best scan, analyze, and organize your messages. Behavioral approaches, the way you interact with email, are critical to reducing email overload.
Research has found that you must focus on improving skills across all three of these areas (Organizational, Technical, and Behavioral) in order to make the greatest improvements in your email skills and the largest reduction in email overload.

About the Author

Dr. Michael Einstein is a full-time business technology professional for a large multi-national corporation.
His doctoral dissertation was on the intersection of email processing skills, email overload, and technology training. He is very active in email overload research. For more information see his recently launched website which contains a wealth of resources to help others learn to better manage their inboxes and reduce their information and email overload levels.

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